Discussion:
Would this position be borderline in a pool hall?
(too old to reply)
Paul Epstein
2020-06-21 11:50:53 UTC
Permalink
Tim and I both have only two checkers left.
Tim has one checker on his five point and one on his two point.

I have one checker on my three point and one on my ace point.

Tim is on roll, and, rather obviously, he owns the cube.

Most people here would know this is D/T.
However, this is a definitional question about the concept of "borderline".
Is this double "borderline"?

For a further question, why did I include "a pool hall" in my subject
heading?

Paul
BlueDice
2020-06-21 20:01:36 UTC
Permalink
Post by Paul Epstein
Tim and I both have only two checkers left.
Tim has one checker on his five point and one on his two point.
I have one checker on my three point and one on my ace point.
Tim is on roll, and, rather obviously, he owns the cube.
Most people here would know this is D/T.
However, this is a definitional question about the concept of "borderline".
Is this double "borderline"?
For a further question, why did I include "a pool hall" in my subject
heading?
Paul
Pool halls are notoriously infested with hustlers and gamblers.
This could be a no redouble in a pool hall since you don't really want to broadcast how good a bg player you are to onlookers who may check their phone and see that the redouble is correct by a smidgen. The notional cost of not redoubling is 30 cents in 100$.
--
BD
Don't tap the glass as the poker hustlers might say.
Paul Epstein
2020-06-21 22:57:50 UTC
Permalink
Post by BlueDice
Post by Paul Epstein
Tim and I both have only two checkers left.
Tim has one checker on his five point and one on his two point.
I have one checker on my three point and one on my ace point.
Tim is on roll, and, rather obviously, he owns the cube.
Most people here would know this is D/T.
However, this is a definitional question about the concept of "borderline".
Is this double "borderline"?
For a further question, why did I include "a pool hall" in my subject
heading?
Paul
Pool halls are notoriously infested with hustlers and gamblers.
This could be a no redouble in a pool hall since you don't really want to broadcast how good a bg player you are to onlookers who may check their phone and see that the redouble is correct by a smidgen. The notional cost of not redoubling is 30 cents in 100$.
--
BD
Don't tap the glass as the poker hustlers might say.
Stick's name on his passport is probably not "Stick". I think it's Jacob.
If I recall correctly, the moniker is because he used to work in a pool
hall. So I meant "Is this borderline from Stick's point of view?" He
has very demanding standards.

Paul
b***@gmail.com
2020-06-25 00:33:42 UTC
Permalink
Post by Paul Epstein
Post by BlueDice
Post by Paul Epstein
Tim and I both have only two checkers left.
Tim has one checker on his five point and one on his two point.
I have one checker on my three point and one on my ace point.
Tim is on roll, and, rather obviously, he owns the cube.
Most people here would know this is D/T.
However, this is a definitional question about the concept of "borderline".
Is this double "borderline"?
For a further question, why did I include "a pool hall" in my subject
heading?
Paul
Pool halls are notoriously infested with hustlers and gamblers.
This could be a no redouble in a pool hall since you don't really want to broadcast how good a bg player you are to onlookers who may check their phone and see that the redouble is correct by a smidgen. The notional cost of not redoubling is 30 cents in 100$.
--
BD
Don't tap the glass as the poker hustlers might say.
Stick's name on his passport is probably not "Stick". I think it's Jacob.
If I recall correctly, the moniker is because he used to work in a pool
hall. So I meant "Is this borderline from Stick's point of view?" He
has very demanding standards.
Paul
Jacob it is. Borderline it is. Reference positions need to be borderline and the more broad you allow the borderline numbers to stray, the less precise the reference positions you have access to are. Where do you draw the line? So far I haven't heard anyone speak up other than to say .026 is acceptable to them as borderline. When is it too much?

Stick
Tim Chow
2020-06-25 14:45:11 UTC
Permalink
Post by b***@gmail.com
So far I haven't heard anyone speak up other than to say .026 is acceptable
to them as borderline. When is it too much?
Audio quality is poor over USENET, so it's understandable that you didn't
Post by b***@gmail.com
I think a sensible definition would be "Low enough so that any human,
no matter how good, should not be concerned if their decision went the
other way."
This definition means that my definition of "borderline" varies with
the difficulty of the position. But hey, that's a bug, not a feature.
I don't think there's much point in trying to define "borderline" precisely,
but my intuition is closer to Paul's than to yours. In a lot of positions,
I don't expect to ever be able to evaluate the equity to an accuracy of
0.03, and it's not even clear to me that the computer can either. So for
practical purposes this counts as borderline. On the other hand, racing cubes
can often be calculated to higher accuracy than that, so a mistake of this
size is a signal that I should study the position more, and have a good chance
of permanently improving my game if I do so.

---
Tim Chow

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